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Dr. Nick Curry is a chiropractor that is also certified through the highly esteemed Titleist Performance Institute as a medical, fitness, and junior golf wellness professional.  He is the owner of Integrative Health and Sports Performance in Bellbrook and serves at the Team Chiropractor to Wright State and Miami Universities.  To Visit their Website or call 937-848-8500

THE PERFECT MEAL

Each meal should consist of fresh, minimally processed foods. This includes protein, vegetables, smart carbohydrates and healthy fats. This is good information to know, but how do you turn these foods into a delicious meal? Flavors, seasonings and cooking methods are they key to making your meal perfect.

1.      CHOOSE YOUR INGREDIENTS

When choosing your ingredients, there are a couple of things to consider. First, what are you in the mood for? You’ll be more likely to enjoy your meal if it consists of foods you actually wantto eat. Second, what is available? FIFO. First in, first out. If you purchased broccoli over the weekend and green beans last night, the broccoli should probably be eaten first so it doesn’t go bad!

Start by selecting one ingredient from the columns below.

Protein

Vegetables

Carbohydrates

Fats

Chicken

Bell Peppers

Potatoes

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Beef

Asparagus

Sweet Potatoes

Sesame Oil

Salmon

Broccoli

Brown Rice

Avocado Oil

Pork

Cauliflower

Quinoa

Coconut Oil

Lentils

Carrots

Chickpeas

Butter

Beans

Green Beans

Oats

Avocados

Eggs

Spinach

Whole Grain Pasta

Chopped Nuts

Yogurt

Kale

Legumes

Turkey

Brussels Sprouts

Squash

2.      PORTION YOUR FOODS

Below are recommendations for how much of each ingredient should be eaten per meals. Portion sizes differ among each individual based on multiple factors: how man meals you’re eating per day, caloric needs, activity levels, and appetite. Use your hand as a guide when putting your plate together!

 

Women

Men

Protein

1 Palm

2 Palms

Vegetables

1 Fist

2 Fists

Carbohydrates

1 Cupped Hand

2 Cupped Hands

Fats

1 Thumb

2 Thumbs

3.     CHOOSE GARNISHES

What flavor profile or flare do you like on your foods? Mix and match different herbs and spices to create the perfect flavor. Most herbs and spices don’t add unnecessary sodium to dishes, whereas many already prepared combinations contain sodium or MSG. 

Feeling Italian? Add some oregano, basil and olives to your dish.

Mexican? Add cilantro, cumin, chipotles and lime.

Japanese? Miso, Sesame seeds, ginger, and seaweed.

4.     COOKING THE FOOD

You’ve chosen your ingredients and you know what type of flavor profile you want for your dish, now you have to prepare it! Start with cooking methods you are familiar with. As you get more comfortable in the kitchen, explore and try new ways of making dishes!

If you’ve chosen fresh herbs, make sure to add them to your veggies while cooking. Or, if you’d rather, you can garnish your plate with them at the end. Any dried spices would be delicious when added to your carbohydrate and/ or chosen protein. While your protein is cooking, add any citrus fruit you’ve chosen to garnish with. If you didn’t choose a cooking oil as your healthy fat, make sure to top with those fats at the end!

5.     PORTION IT OUT

We’ve reviewed how much is recommended to start with on your plate for each meal. Go ahead and create your plate based on the above recommendations and top with any herbs and garnishes.

Remember, if you have portioned your plate out but feel satisfied before finishing, you don’t haveto eat it all. That’s what Tupperware was made for! If you do still feel hungry, try adding in another half cupped hand of your smart carbohydrate oranother thumb of fat!

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